Weird Amphibians Join List of At-Risk Oddities

Weird Amphibians Join List of At-Risk Oddities
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The Gardiner's Seychelles frog, measuring in at less than half an inch (11 millimeters), is perhaps the world's smallest frog, according to the Zoological Society of London.

The animal is one of ten species selected by the organization for conservation attention as part of the newly announced EDGE Amphibians program.

"Tragically, amphibians tend to be the overlooked members of the animal kingdom, even though one in every three amphibian species is currently threatened with extinction, a far higher proportion than that of bird or mammal species," said Jonathan Baillie, head of the EDGE program, in a press statement released on January 22, 2008.

"These species are the 'canaries in the coal mine'—they are highly sensitive to factors such as climate change and pollution, which lead to extinction, and are a stark warning of things to come. If we lose them, other species will inevitably follow."

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—Photo by Naomi Dook/courtesy Zoological Society of London
 
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