Bali Corals "Jolted" Back to Life

Bali Corals
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Coral formations grow on metal structures submerged in the Pemuteran Bay in Bali, Indonesia, in this January 21, 2004 photo.

The structures are part of a new effort to literally ''jolt'' coral back to life with electricity.

When hooked to an energy source, limestone—the building block of reefs—naturally gathers on the metal structures. Workers then salvage coral that has broken from damaged reefs and affix the pieces of live coral to the structure.

The coral off Bali's northwestern shore had been destroyed during to rising temperatures, dynamite fishing, and cyanide poisoning.

"Our method is the only one that speeds coral growth," said project co-founder Thomas Goreau who is presenting his research at the ongoing UN-led Climate Change Conference in Bali, told the Associated Press.

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—Photograph by Wolf Hilbertz/AP
 
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