Cyclone Death Toll Up to 3,100 in Bangladesh, May Rise

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"Some were identified and taken away by relatives. We buried dozens of others near where we found them," said Ali Akbar, a volunteer.

Survivors picked through the village's wreckage, looking for anything salvageable in a jumble of splintered wood, bamboo and corrugated iron houses, fallen trees, and bloated animal carcasses. A stench filled the air.

In the neighboring village of Bainsamarta, Sheikh Mubarak, 40, sat among the ruins of his hut weeping for his 12-year-old daughter.

"As our house was washed away by walls of water, I grabbed my daughter and ran for shelter. The monster waves swept her away from me," he said. "Allah should have taken me instead."

Survivors said many of the deaths could have been prevented, but people failed to heed warnings to move to higher ground as the storm approached Thursday.

"Nothing is going to happen—that was our first thought, and we went to bed," said Dhalan Mridha, a 45-year-old farm worker from the village of Galachipa.

"Just before midnight the winds came like hundreds of demons. Our small hut was swept away like a piece of paper, and we all ran for shelter," he said.

On the way, Mridha was separated from his wife, mother, and two children. He found their bodies the next morning, stuck in a battered bush.

Relief Efforts

Government and relief agencies stepped up efforts to get help to devastated areas.

Army helicopters flew in high-protein cookies supplied by the World Food Program, said Emamul Haque, a spokesperson for the UN agency's office in the capital, Dhaka.

International groups promised initial aid totaling $25 million during a meeting with Bangladesh agencies Monday, Haque said.

Tents, water, rice, and other relief items have been slow to reach many.

In the town of Barguna long lines of anxious people formed at the market, hoping for word that help was on the way.

"We have been waiting here for several hours, but no relief," said Uthan Ching, who left clutching an empty plastic bag.

Government officials defended relief efforts and expressed confidence that authorities were up to the task.

"We have enough food and water," said Shahidul Islam, the top official in Bagerhat, a battered district near Barguna. "We are going to overcome the problem."

Aid Money

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in a statement that several million dollars were available from the United Nations' emergency response funds, depending on the need.

Many foreign governments and international groups also pledged to help.

The United States offered $2.1 million and two U.S. Marine Corps transport planes arrived in Dhaka with medical supplies, said Chowdhury, the Bangladeshi army spokesman.

A U.S. military medical team was already in Bangladesh and two U.S. Navy ships, each carrying at least 20 helicopters and tons of supplies, would be made available if the Bangladesh government requested them, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said in a statement.

The European Union promised $2.2 million and the British government $5.1 million. Italy's Roman Catholic bishops conference said it would donate $2.9 million. The governments of Germany and France each pledged $730,000, Japan sent $318,000 in relief supplies, and the Philippines said it would provide a medical team.

Bangladesh is a densely populated nation sitting on a vast river delta. Storms batter its low-lying lands every year, often killing large numbers of people.

Only two people were killed in Bangladesh by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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