Week in Photos: Magnetar Explosion, Devil's Bible, More

Week in Photos: Magnetar Explosion, Devil's Bible, More
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Prague, Czech Republic, September 19, 2007—Visitors peer at the Codex Gigas—also called the Devil's Bible—during the opening of an exhibition at the Klementinum, the Czech Republic's national library.

Created in the 13th century A.D. by a Benedictine monk, the 624-page, 165-pound (75-kilogram) manuscript was considered to be a wonder of the world during Europe's Middle Ages. The book contains the Old and New Testaments of the Bible along with several historical texts. A curious illustration of Lucifer gives the tome its nickname.

When the Thirty Years' War threw Europe into turmoil in the 1600s, Swedish troops invaded Prague—which then housed the book—and carried the Devil's Bible away as booty.

After lengthy negotiations, the tome is now on loan to the Klementinum for a four-month exhibition, offering Czechs their first home glimpse of the ancient text in almost 360 years.

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—Photograph by Michal Cizek/AFP
 
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