Photo Gallery: Mummy of Egypt's ''Lost Queen'' Found

Photo Gallery: Mummy of Egypt's ''Lost Queen'' Found
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Tourists at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo walk past a statue depicting the female pharaoh Hatshepsut as a man, wearing the customary beard of a male ruler.

Hatshepsut cut an extraordinary figure in ancient Egyptian history, having ruled as both queen and king.

The daughter of nobles, she initially rose to the traditional role of queen after marrying the pharaoh Tuthmose II, her half-brother.

After his death around 1479 B.C., she declared herself a pharaoh, ruling as co-king with her young stepson.

In time, she came to be recognized as a fully male ruler, depicted in statues and wall carvings with a beard and a bare chest without breasts.

Hatshepsut is credited with overseeing many ambitious construction projects and expanding trade in the region during her reign. She ruled for 21 years until her death in 1458 B.C.

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—Photograph by Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images
 
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