Infographic: Lunar Eclipse March 3-4 -- When, Where to See It

Lunar eclipse graphic
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March 3, 2007—This weekend presents a rare opportunity to see a total eclipse of the moon around dusk in the eastern U.S., Canada, and South America.

The lunar eclipse should be especially easy to see in Africa and western Europe, where the astronomical event will take place when the night sky is fully dark. Astronomy buffs in western Asia may see a sky show just as the moon is setting.

The eclipse is to begin at 5:44 p.m. eastern time (10:44 p.m. Greenwich mean time) and end a little over an hour later.

A total lunar eclipse occurs when a full moon passes entirely through the Earth's dark inner shadow, or umbra. A partial eclipse is when part of the moon is in the Earth's outer shadow, or penumbra, which is not as dark.

Unlike a total solar eclipse, a total lunar eclipse is not black but typically a reddish orange color during totality. Watching a lunar eclipse safely requires no special glasses, as an eclipse of the sun does.

See more moon facts >>

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