Rare Whales Appear off Scotland, Heat Wave Blamed

<< Back to Page 1   Page 2 of 2

Macdonald thinks that the whales and dolphins are likely to be following their favorite snack.

"Sand eels prefer colder waters, and a huge amount must have come into the [Moray] Firth [an inlet of the North Sea in northern Scotland] this year," he said.

The warmer waters on the west coast may have become too hot, attracting the sand eels to the relatively cooler waters on the east coast.

However, warming oceans are not the only explanation for the whale invasion.

"Possibly we are getting more sightings because more people are looking now," Hoyt, of the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society, said.

Whale- and dolphin-watching is becoming a popular hobby in the U.K., he notes, and the Scottish Seabird Centre in North Berwick has reported a huge rise in interest in whale-watching in recent years.

Free Email News Updates
Best Online Newsletter, 2006 Codie Awards

Sign up for our Inside National Geographic newsletter. Every two weeks we'll send you our top stories and pictures (see sample).

<< Back to Page 1   Page 2 of 2


SOURCES AND RELATED WEB SITES

ADVERTISEMENT

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC'S PHOTO OF THE DAY

NEWS FEEDS     After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.   After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.

Get our news delivered directly to your desktop—free.
How to Use XML or RSS

National Geographic Daily News To-Go

Listen to your favorite National Geographic news daily, anytime, anywhere from your mobile phone. No wires or syncing. Download Stitcher free today.
Click here to get 12 months of National Geographic Magazine for $15.