Hand-Tagging Great White Sharks

Shark Experts Prepare to Tag a Great White Shark
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Wildlife Conservation Society researchers began their shark-tagging project with "small" great whites, which measured six to seven feet (two meters). The team has subsequently fitted animals stretching nearly 13 feet (4 meters) long and weighing 1,650 pounds (750 kilograms).

The sharks are caught on a hook and line then maneuvered into a specially designed metal "cradle," which lifts the sharks out of the water for three to seven minutes.

While researchers fix a satellite tag in the animal's dorsal fin, veterinarians pump seawater through the mouth and gills of the great white and inject drugs and vitamins that help the shark recover from capture stress.

The entire process, from hookup to release, lasts about 15 adrenaline-filled minutes.

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—Photograph by Linda Staverees, courtesy Wildlife Conservation Society
 
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