Animal-Borne Crittercam Makes the Leap to Land

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The grizzly bears studied in Alaska inadvertently provided a similar solution: their lenses were cleaned each time they went fishing for salmon. Unfortunately, hyenas did not extend the same courtesy. "The lens stayed clean for a couple of hours, and after that, it was just completely caked in mud," Rasch said.

With Terrestrial Crittercam still early on in its development, the possibilities for future development are almost too numerous to count. "I guess the problem really is there are so many avenues we can explore, and only so many hours in the day," said Rasch.

"Each animal really deserves to have the best system that we can put together for it...I hate to sort of rush things out of the door. I would rather do it right."

With that in mind, Terrestrial Crittercam seems bound for a promising evolutionary course.

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