Harvest Moon Allure Hasn't Waned

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During the vernal equinox, the opposite happens. Instead of the lapse between moon rises being unusually short, they are unusually long.

Full Moon Romance

Each full moon of the year has a name, with its origin based either in Native American or European folklore. The harvest moon is rooted in European culture because many European countries are located at northern latitudes where the Harvest Moon effect is more pronounced there than, say, Washington, D.C, explained Chester.

Other full moon names include the hunter's moon in October because it provides extra light to chase wildlife across stubbly fields. Native Americans named November's full moon the beaver moon because it was the last chance to set beaver traps to ensure a supply of warm, winter furs.

And while the harvest moon gets its name for the extra light it provides farmers and gardeners, it is also the last full moon under which to grab your sweetheart and cuddle in the outdoors, according to the song Shine On Harvest Moon penned in 1903 by the late vaudeville performers Nora Bays and Jack Norworth:

Shine on, shine on harvest moon up in the sky.
I ain't had no lovin' Since January, February, June, or July.
Snow time ain't no time to stay outdoors and spoon.
So shine on, shine on harvest moon, for me and my gal.

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