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Among the materials used in the process were natron, a natural salt-like substance used to dry out the dead animals; resin, which coats the internal tissue; turpentine, which acts to kill internal bacteria; and various oils, which soften the fur and skin.

"So far, our rabbits have survived quite well, and we've got x-rays of them to see how they compare with the x-rays of ancient Egyptian mummies," Ikram said.

She expects to bury the animal mummies soon so that, in five or six years, she can check to see whether they have been successfully preserved.

Given her passion for Egyptology and mummies, would Ikram like to be mummified herself one day?

"I'm not keen on being mummified," she said, "but I'd like a nice Egyptian tomb…Someone is already carving my offering slab for me, with lots of chocolate—something that they didn't have in ancient Egypt."

To see the rabbit mummies and learn more, watch National Geographic Today.

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