Seals Use Whiskers for Hunting, Study Finds

<< Back to Page 1   Page 2 of 2

The researchers hypothesize that the whiskers, which are also known as vibrissae, normally vibrate in a certain way, and that when a fish trail is encountered the change in the vibration alerts the seal to the presence of prey.

The experiments were conducted in laboratory conditions; the next step will be to follow seals in the ocean, says Dehnhardt.

"Our results not only provide for the first time an explanation on how animals that did not possess a sonar system like dolphins can orientate in the dark and find prey, but also give us a new view on aquatic environments," says Dehnhardt. "The study once more shows us that there is more under water than humans can imagine and perceive with their sensory systems."

<< Back to Page 1   Page 2 of 2


SOURCES AND RELATED WEB SITES

ADVERTISEMENT

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC'S PHOTO OF THE DAY

NEWS FEEDS     After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.   After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.

Get our news delivered directly to your desktop—free.
How to Use XML or RSS

National Geographic Daily News To-Go

Listen to your favorite National Geographic news daily, anytime, anywhere from your mobile phone. No wires or syncing. Download Stitcher free today.
Click here to get 12 months of National Geographic Magazine for $15.