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Watch Our Favorite Shark Videos

Take a look at these sharks exploring the nooks and crannies in oceans around the world.

See the first time this mysterious ghost shark was caught on camera.

Are you ready to binge on amazing videos of sharks?

Some were captured enjoying a meal, while others were caught on camera for the very first time. In some of National Geographic’s favorite shark videos, explore the underwater life of the creatures that have prowled Earth’s seas for some 400 million years.

GHOST SHARK CAUGHT ON CAMERA FOR THE FIRST TIME

Previously discovered in the deep sea near Australia, New Zealand, and New Caledonia, researchers observed the pointy-nosed blue chimaera in the North Pacific for the first time in 2009 (see video above).

This footage was captured by a remotely operated vehicle as far as 6,700 feet below the ocean surface. Only recently were experts able to confirm that these fish were the same species as the ones that were previously discovered in the Southern Hemisphere.

SHARKS DISCOVERED INSIDE UNDERWATER VOLCANO

Ocean engineer and National Geographic explorer Brennan Phillips led a team to the remote Solomon Islands in search of hydrothermal activity. They found plenty—including a surprise discovery of sharks in a submarine volcano. The main peak of the volcano, called Kavachi, was not erupting during their expedition, so they were able to drop instruments, including a deep-sea camera, into the crater.

The footage revealed hammerheads and silky sharks living inside, seemingly unaffected by the hostile temperatures and acidity.

UNEXPECTED SHARK GIVES EXPLORER SHOCK OF HIS LIFE

Another National Geographic researcher was startled to see a Greenland shark where none had ever been seen before: off Russia's Franz Josef Land. An underwater camera captured images of the shark, a species that may live for centuries and which scientists know very little about.

SHARKS LIGHT UP IN NEON COLORS

While studying biofluorescent coral, researchers discovered a shark that reflects certain light, along with a stingray, eel, and other fish. The study used special lighting and camera filters to identify more than 180 species of marine fishes that exhibit biofluorescence.

TIGER SHARKS: SWIMMING WITH AN AWESOME PREDATOR

Swim along with photographer Brian Skerry as he dives with tiger sharks in an area near Grand Bahama Island known as Tiger Beach. Tiger sharks are responsible for more recorded attacks on people than any shark except the great white, but here they are calm, friendly and curious.

GREAT WHITE SHARK FEASTS ON DEAD WHALE

Filmed off the coast of southern California, this shark feasted on a dead whale for more than 18 hours. Famous for their prowess as predators, little is known about their more docile scavenging behaviors. They have been observed regurgitating already eaten food to make room for more calorically rich meat. While sharks have frequently been observed hunting, scavenging is less often seen.

EXTREMELY RARE MEGAMOUTH SHARK FILMED

This extremely rare megamouth shark was filmed off the coast of Indonesia. Only about a hundred megamouths have been observed since they were first discovered in 1976. They are filter feeders, slowly swimming through the water with their mouths open to feed on plankton. They alternate between deep and shallow ocean waters in search of food, and due to their elusive nature, little is known about the population health of the species.