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See Why 2015 May Be the Hottest Year Ever

Already, the first six months of 2015 have been the hottest on record.

Anomaly of land and ocean temperature, June 2015
Based on 1981-2010 average.
5ºC
(9ºF)
0ºC
(0ºF)
-5ºC
(-9ºF)

arctic Ocean

North

America

Europe

Asia

Pacific

Ocean

Africa

Equator

atlantic

Ocean

Indian

Ocean

South

America

australia

Antarctica

2010
2005
2000
NG STAFF
SOURCE: NOAA National Centers for Environmental information, State of the Climate: Global Analysis for June 2015

This summer has felt like a scorcher in many parts of the world, and now scientists have the data to prove it.

June land- and ocean-temperature anomalies
Based on 1881-2015 average
Globally, it's the hottest ever recorded...
The 12-month variation of the temperature in June 2015 is almost 1.5°F above average—the highest ever.
1881
2015
... but the difference is smaller in the United States.
Though the country's trend overall is comparable to the worldwide trend, a much colder-than-usual winter in the Midwest made 2015's average temperature lower than that of 2012, which was the hottest year in the U.S. historical record.
U.S. data for the 48 contiguous states as of 1895
1881
2015
NG STAFF
SOURCE: NOAA

This past June was the hottest June on record for the planet, reports the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The records begin in 1880.

The average temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.58°F (0.88°C) above the 20th century average. It beats the previous record, set last year, by 0.22°F (0.12°C).

This year could become the hottest on record. During the first six months of 2015, average land and sea temperatures were 1.53°F (0.85°C) above the 20th century average. That beats the previous record for the same period since 1880 (2010) by 0.16°F (0.09°C).

As the graphs on this page show, the higher temperatures have not been consistent across the globe. Lower temperatures have been reported in some areas, including part of the Northeast and Midwest in the United States, which suffered under a particularly severe winter. But much more of the planet has been warmer, driving the overall trend.

California, for instance, has seen record heat, exacerbating drought.

The world’s climate system is complex and not fully understood, but a pattern of warming has been emerging in recent years. Most scientists think human activity is playing a significant role.